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Subject: Cinderfella 2, Chapter 29 The Fae Story: Cinderfella 2: A New Life Chapter: 29 The Fae Author: Eric McQueen ail) Mature Readers only due to sexual situations and graphic sexual content Freedom of expression is precious. To do that Nifty needs help. Your donation is greatly desired. Give to fty/ or this story ends and all the others! That would be a crime! The Fae “Me!?” I blurted in disbelief. “I have never had that…” “Yes,” Demetrius nodded, “you’ve done it before and just didn’t know it.” Toby ran to me and hugged me hard, so did Seth who added a “thank God.” It was a Toby sandwich between his two fathers. Then Thomas joined in. Max walked toward us, “I know this is a family moment…” “Which now includes all of you!” Seth stated happily. “My arms can only go around so many at a time. You’ll have to wait your turn.” Max chuckled, “I’m patient,” he pointed at Wahkooha who hadn’t moved much. He was still mourning his loss of power, “What do we do with him now?” He pointed beyond Wahkooha at the Native warriors, “And them?” Dakotah was now walking up. He never touched any of us, but his whole demeanor had changed. He was almost smiling! In his eyes you could see that. “You have the touch of the spirits.” He was about to give me his hand, but froze. “Is it okay to touch you now?” “Sure,” I said and shook his hand. The senior Native now really smiled, “I prayed to the spirits to remove this man from power. Now, we got our answer. Thank you.” “We don’t have the authority here to really punish Wahkooha,” I said to Dakotah. “What happens to him is your decision.” Dakotah waved his hands helplessly, “My say would be to bring him before the Tribe’s Tribunal. When I was Chief of the Kalispel, that would be my decision.” Chitto nodded and grinned walking up a little, “That makes sense. How many tribal chiefs are here?” “Twenty-two,” Dakotah replied. Chitto’s eyes widened in surprise. “That’s every tribe within three or four hundred miles,” Chitto observed after a quick contemplation. “There are about thirty tribes,” Dakotah corrected. “What happened to the other chiefs?” I asked. “Two died of natural causes,” Dakotah answered. “Some resisted Wahkooha and they were killed.” Seth looked at Dakotah and cautiously said, “You’re now free to go back home.” “But we won’t,” Dakotah said and waved at Wahkooha. “He was right about the attacks. We suffered greater losses and defeat alone. That was twenty years ago.” He gave a grudging nod. “That’s when he came to the Kalispel.” I looked at Wahkooha. In spite of what he did, he looked to be in his mid to late thirties. “He was a teenager then.” Dakotah laughed, “So were you only about ten years ago. He had received a couple of feathers by then.” I nodded. In all the tribes, earning the first feather meant you’d come of age. You were a man. “He already had four tribes that joined him,” Dakotah nodded, “In the beginning he was very helpful. What power he had convinced everyone he was what he said. Over time he started doing things and…” Dakotah said sadly, “he took the virginity of many young maidens. They couldn’t say no.” Seth’s eyes widened, “No pregnancies!?” Dakotah nodded, “Just a couple.” He said softly. “He’s a father?” Seth asked. Like me he was worried there were others like Wahkooha. “No,” Dakotah answered. I knew. I didn’t want to, but I knew he killed them. And not just the baby. My anger grew, coupled with disgust, “Yeah, Christian and I grew up on stories about kings that thought they were above the law. They always suffer at the end.” I shrugged. “They WERE the law.” I waved at Wahkooha, “He knew the law didn’t apply to a god.” “And deteriorated as the years passed,” Dakotah admitted. “There were a few that tried to kill him, but Wahkooha would find out and kill them and their entire family.” Chitto came over having heard what Dakotah said. “Being together is a great idea, but leadership is needed and a working government.” He did the “come here” motion subtly with his hand. “We’ll have to come up with the possibilities. There are other Chiefs here. We need to include them.” “We’re not eating?” Beau asked in disappointment. “Dinner!!” I slapped my own forehead, “I knew there was something else!” I smiled at Beau, “It slipped my mind. Sorry, Beau.” “And all the Three Sisters Venison Stew you can eat,” Ceto promised, putting her hand through Beau’s arm at his elbow. I looked at Dakotah, “Do you have a dungeon?” After I assured the Native warriors Wahkooha couldn’t hurt anyone now. They had seen what happened, so my saying he couldn’t hurt them…they reached tentatively for Wahkooha at first, but after getting no resistance became more aggressive and hauled a sobbing Wahkooha away. Whatever penalty they decided on was their decision. We still had the death penalty in A’Dore and Blethos. Deena Thorne was the last execution in Blethos in a while. There was the prison island Galgor. Prisoners were sent to several little islands there. No guards on the main island, but watched by guards on the other islands. Seeds were given and no one was allowed to leave. There were sharks and no one survived in the water because the staff on the other islands threw bloody, raw meat and blood in the water around the island prison. The sharks didn’t leave. The islands were surrounded by a thousand miles of water from any land or country. Some escaped on boats they made, but with no tools, nails, or sealant, the boats fell apart. Some would make it to one of the other islands, where they were killed instantly when found. No trial. It had flaws, but it was a deterrent. No one ever came back. That Native Tribunal of grandmothers was not lenient at all. I hated that anyone had to die, but following deaths the criminal caused, it was the law. Often they were killed by other prisoners. There was an insane madness in some cases, but until we learn to treat it… Yes, that was a rabbit. We turned to the table and found bowls full of steaming stew. The wonderful aroma hit my nose; meaning it just got here. The table and chairs were still there and I will admit it, I was good with that. Sitting on those pillows on the floor was fine, but not how I was used to dine. Of course, I had a million questions for Demetrius. I sifted through them. So, I tried some simple things, like causing the fork to rise or just move. Nothing happened. “How could I cure Seth and do what I did with Wahkooha and can’t do anything now? You said I probably did in the past and didn’t know it?” Demetrius smiled, “Extreme emotions is the trigger.” He shrugged, “It is for us. I don’t know about the Children of Eve. Both times you were experiencing intense emotions. First, your wedding and the first kiss in public to someone you love. The second was when Toby was about to be grabbed. You ARE his father.” Demetrius shrugged. “When you learned to use the sword, were you taught to control your emotions?” “Yes,” I answered. “You’re less effective feeling fear, but there is a rise in adrenaline.” “And when Arthur charged you both after you defeated Darius?” Demetrius asked. “You felt emotion then.” “He could hurt Seth,” I nodded. “There were some strong emotions then.” I shook my head, “But he stumbled over his own two feet.” “Did he?” Demetrius gave a shrug, “Maybe, but it was even ground.” I gave a grudging nod, “Okay, but I saw Wakhooha’s parents. I could describe his father in detail.” Demetrius lightly chuckled and nodded a shrug. “I don’t know.” He pointed across the table as Lukus and Martha spoke with Val. “Because of Lukus you saw Seth’s mother and can describe her, too.” “You know people,” Seth said to me softly. “At times that seems like magic. And I’m not talking just Candor. A blind man could see he was evil. But Bent, Garth, Zeke, Gabe, their parents…” He smiled. “Your brother told me that from the time you were fifteen he had you sit when he promoted, demoted, or hired anyone for the palace.” Seth leaned in kissing me. “I did, too. You are never wrong about anyone.” “That’s just intuition!” I balked. “So?” Seth grinned. “How you read people so easily is magic to me.” “Uncle Deme,” Toby said. “You and Aunt Dara were fairy-godparents. Right?” Demetrius nodded, “That’s what they called us.” “Has anybody ever referred to you as…” he frowned, “I don’t know how to say it, so I will sign it.” His fingers moved and he spelled “fae or faye?” Then he clarified that, “I don’t know which vowel is silent.” “Fae?” Demetrius asked, surprised, “Where did you see that word?” “In A’Dore,” Toby said. “They have an extensive library and I read this book about King Arthur. He had a half-sister named Morgan le Fae.” Toby scrunched his brow, “But I read she is famous because she was capable of magic. I’ve read other books and they called Gaelic people and Celts Fae.” He nodded, “Sorcery and witchcraft was used by the Druids. Her name was the giveaway. It means Morgan the Fae. She was said to be a witch or sorceress.” “Morgana?” Seth asked. “Camelot and Knights of the Round Table? That Morgan le Fae?” Toby grinned as he nodded, “Yes. She is the most famous of the Fae. She went by many names, Morgan, Morgana, and Morgan Le Faye.” He said and signed so we could see the difference. I smiled and nodded at Toby, “I do know of that book and there are others. There are stories about Sir Gawian, Sir Tristram, Sir Lancelot, but I especially loved Prince Valiant. It’s a good thing I read about Prince Valiant.” I looked closer to Toby seeming to be confidential. “Prince Valiant was a prince from Thule on the coast of Norway. He wins the favor with King Arthur and Merlin and becomes a Knight of the Round Table. He meets, falls in love with and marries Aleta, Queen of the Misty Isles.” I smiled at Seth, “And you know it, too or you wouldn’t have said anything or known the names.” “I know of the tale,” Seth qualified, “Isn’t that what it is? A tale?” I smiled bigger, “Or could be like the one about Cinderella or about us?” I waved him off. “The tales about us, Christian, and Ella get more fantastic as it goes. Just like that little fish that got away that becomes a monster fish, the story says the poor man fought hard all day, but he got away.” “Tell me those books and I want to read them,” Toby stated, a little excited. “I explained about all the stories we had to read as Christian and I grew up,” I said. “Tales of valiant knights with a Code of Honor and Honesty were required to give us core values.” “Didn’t that story come about in the 12th Century?” Seth asked. “And even then it was viewed as historical,” Toby said, “I read they don’t know the exact date, but folklore of stories used in Camelot began in the fifth or sixth century.” He looked at Demetrius, “The word Fae was already in use for the Celts and Druids. They didn’t name them Fae because of her. She was Fae. It is a name for supernatural beings. Aren’t you a supernatural being? You’ve been to many places. Have you been called Fae?” Demetrius’ smile grew, “Yes, I have.” Lukus nodded, “We all have, but we’re not supernatural…” “You’re nuts!” I interrupted, using the Creid word now. Max was right, it just fit. Lukus began to laugh, “That might be true, but we are perfectly natural. We’re humans who can access an element that is natural. Magic.” I nodded, “I read the Fae were here before we were.” I said to Seth. I waved to the other Children of Lilith. “They were here before there was even an Eve. Did they really exist?” “Did they really exist?” Demetrius shrugged, “They could have.” “You didn’t see them?” Toby asked. Demetrius sat back with his eyes widening with exaggerated shock like he did when Toby was smaller, It still worked because Toby chuckled…his way, “How old do you think I am?” He asked mockingly outraged. Toby grinned and shrugged, “I don’t know, but I know it has been hundreds of years?” “It was before my time,” Demetrius muttered. His tone told me he was not too offended and knew the humor of it. “Yes, there were quite a few in Britannia. In what is England now. The Romans came and drove most north. Then the Church came with their paladins of warrior priests and monks.” “Paladins? What’s that?” Toby asked, “I read about the German Paladins. What are they from the Church?” “They are hired muscle to enforce what they believe,” I said to Toby. “Men that force people to conform to what they say. They began an Inquisition to force all Jews or other religions to convert. If they didn’t, the muscle would round them up and torture them until they did.” “That’s stupid!” Toby said. “How does that mean they’re converted? It’s just words.” I nodded, “That’s right. I taught you to get things verified with truth. No one can tell you what to believe or force you to believe. The Church sent some to A’Dore,” I said. “Your great grandfather kicked them out when they began to do it here.” I looked at Seth, “Your father didn’t go to any church and he didn’t like priests and argued against them often.” “No,” Seth chuckled, “he didn’t like them. You don’t either. Remember Father Markum who was banished? Dad was furious they wouldn’t even bless our marriage.” Seth did a very good impression of King Alexander, “Who do they think they are? They speak for the Church, but sure as Hell don’t speak for God. They’ve been given too much fucking power in Europa! Not Blethos.” Seth’s face had changed to his father’s angry scowl. He looked at Toby, “Sorry for cussing, but your Grandfather Alex did when he got upset.” Toby was hiding his chuckle and big smile with his hand. Seth had done that all of Toby’s life which always made Toby laugh. “My grandfather. threw them out, too.” He looked at me. “I mean he literally threw them out of Blethos. The ship they came on had left our harbor and was a day away leaving the Church’s Palatins in Blethos. He commissioned our fastest ship, caught up and had our military throw them overboard into the gulf and our ship sailed back.” I was smiling at that, but I asked, “Could all of them swim?” Seth shrugged, “My father only said, if they didn’t, bursa escort they were motivated to learn that day.” I sat back a little, “And what were we fighting about that last skirmish between Blethos and A’Dore? Our parents would probably get along!” Seth nodded, “Sure, friends that were a thousand miles apart, but we were fighting for Derby, Leicester, and Coventry. A’Dore said those towns were theirs and Blethos said they belonged to us.” I nodded as I remembered now. “Oh, yes.” Those three villages were surrounded by some rich and productive farms, most of which grew wheat and vegetables. Transporting the vegetables to A’Dore was harder as they might spoil, the grain to some millers who made flour by the ton! That flour went to both A’Dore and Blethos. “Which I really didn’t see why, transporting the wheat and flour to A’Dore was easier. Blethos took less resources and time. A’Dore spread from the eastern coastline of the Atlantic Ocean to that big muddy river local Natives call Misi-ziibi which means “Great River.” Local European and British descendants citizens simply call “The Big Muddy” because of all the silt. Yeah, not much imagination on anyone’s part with the name. The river was over two thousand miles long. Those three villages were right on the border they squabbled over. There was a little bloodshed over citizens who wanted to remain part of A’Dore and those that wanted to be part of Blethos. Everybody wants bread.” “But that wasn’t really the main problem, was it?” Seth growled a little, “When it was time to pay the taxes,” Seth used his hand pointing down, “there would be Tax Collectors from A’Dore,” he moved the hand in a large arch to the other side, “AND Blethos demanding tax payment!!” He was almost convincing, but I saw the humor in his eyes. I nodded, “I know charges were filed and those collectors stood on trial for corruption by both kingdoms!” “And WHAT,” Demetrius said loudly to stop Seth’s and my discussion and asked us softer, “pray tell, does that have to do with the Fae, Druids, Morgana, King Arthur, or anything we were talking about?” He pointed at Seth and me, “I’ll tell you. Not a thing!” He looked back at Toby who was laughing harder. “Morgan le Fae could have really existed and so could Arthur. This Morgan le Fae would have been a Child of Eve, but could access the magic.” He nodded as he thought, “The Druid-Fae were like the Natives here. They knew they could use magic. Some were very good at it, Wakhooha’s family were very talented with it. With the Fae scattering around the world, Druids all but vanished.” “They are very secretive,” I said. Demetrius nodded a shrug, “They predate Christianity and the Roman Empire.” “Their paladins were often more than corrupt,” Lukus added. “They would burn villages, kill whole families all in the name of God.” “But God knew,” Seth argued. “Didn’t He try to stop them?” Martha smiled, “We offered to help some innocents. That was hard. If we just appeared they would run or cry Witch.” I nodded, but remembered why we came here, “There’s a lot I’d love to know, but what of those attacks on Blethos, A’Dore and Creid? Creid is starving!” Lukus nodded with his hand up and lowered telling me to calm down. “Two supply caravans have arrived in the past few days…” “And supplemented,” Dara added, “by us.” Demetrius chuckled, “Those poor horses.” He shook his head sadly, but he was grinning. “Those carts on the rails that Yannick had built were so heavily weighted they had to use six horses to pull the carts up!” “They were from A’Dore AND Blethos!” Lukus added laughing, “And a third is coming today!” Martha joined in with the laughter, “They have more food than they know how to deal with!” Demetrius nodded, “We…” he pointed at Lukus, Martha, Dara, and Ceto, “doubled each caravan that came. King Yannick has a kingdom wide celebration for the people and told the merchants to hold on charging anyone this time. Everyone has plenty!” Max heard our conversation and had to ask, “What about those…whatever they were, that attacked the caravans?” Lukus was still chuckling and shook his head, “They won’t be bothering you anymore.” He looked at Toby, “Don’t be frightened, it’s just me.” With that he changed into a Creid Warrior, but grew in size even in the chair! He had to be at least seven and a half feet tall and weighed…a lot! He was bigger than Reese! Somehow his bear shaped helmet black armor made him look more like a bear than I’d seen among the Creid! When he let out a roar of a bear charging angrily, I swear his teeth made him look like a real bear! If that wasn’t enough, a real large dark brown bear rose and towered over Lukus and everyone. The largest Kodick Bear I ever read or heard about. Eight or nine feet tall on his hind legs and had to weigh more than a ton! This bear joined Lukus in a thunderous roar. Our Creid friends who were having their own conversation jumped from their chairs, reaching again for the sword that wasn’t there now. “That’s enough, Lukie,” Martha patted Lukus’ hand and he changed back and the bear disappeared. “Sorry,” Lukus said to the others standing slightly from his chair. “We and some others have chased all the bandits away from Creid, A’Dore, and Blethos. All told by someone like me to stay away.” He looked at Max, “I apologize, but I used the Creid Reputation against them. They told the bears were to protect all three kingdoms,” he shrugged, “and they will for a year or so.” He sat again and looked at me and Seth, “They won’t harm anyone, not in any village or town. It’s more of a show.” “Lukie?” Max chuckled and Lukus gave a look that said to not go there. I understood. They didn’t heal or hurt anyone. “Yes, Demetrius showed that evil man Candor who robbed many people and threatened Seth and me. It was very frightening even knowing who he was.” I smiled, “Did you do what Demetrius did? The Natives were taking care of Wahkooha, but no one rushed in here.” Lukus looked mockingly shocked, “We were having a special moment. The Children of Lilith and Eve are dining together. There was no need for any of them to rush in to save us.” Martha nodded, “And Ceto,” she looked at Ceto, “this stew is the best I’ve ever had!” Ceto smiled from her chair beside Beau. Beau had a full bowl he was eating out of with gusto, but I knew he had been eating a while. Did he have a bottomless bowl? “Thank you, Martha. I’ll tell you what I use if you like,” she patted Beau’s arm making him stop and smile at her. “I have a big man to fill up who loves it.” Beau nodded and held his bowl up. “It’s good!! This is my third bowl!” He grinned and put the bowl down and began eating again. Ceto hugged Beau’s arm and bumped her head against his shoulder, “I did promise him all he can eat.” She patted Beau’s stomach. “I just hope he doesn’t get a bellyache.” To which Beau immediately shook his head. That wasn’t possible as far as he was concerned. Seth laughed at that and leaned toward me and whispered, “Should we be concerned about that? She’s…” he pointed at Ceto, “and he’s…” he didn’t say Children of Lilith of Eve, “He’s younger than she is!” I nodded, “Physically he looks like his age in his late twenties. She looks like a woman in the mid-thirties, but we know she’s over three hundred years old. Demetrius even said he married a Child of Eve in his two hundreds.” I paused as a thought came to me I didn’t like. “Yeah,” Seth nodded. “He committed to that guy in Italia for thirty years.” He shrugged. “Of course, same gender marriage wasn’t allowed then…” That thought I had just caused my heart to ache and I couldn’t stop the tears from coming. I grabbed Seth’s hand, “Oh, God, Seth…I am so sorry.” Seth looked startled and instantly concerned, “Sorry? For what!?” He took my hand and squeezed it. “I supposedly cured you of the scars with your father right there performing our marriage with Christian!” I said sadly and began crying more. I looked at Seth shaking my head, “Why didn’t I cure him? He was sick then!” “Don’t,” Demetrius said, taking my other hand. “Don’t blame yourself. It was natural.” “His father died!!” I yelled at Demetrius. I heard the conversations at the table stop, but I couldn’t stop. “He had that horrible sickness. I could have cured him!! Hell, I could have cured my own father and mother! They’re dead!!” Now, I was sobbing. “I didn’t cure THEM!!” Dara got up, stood me up and hugged me. Demetrius got up and hugged me, too. Dara nodded, “You didn’t know you could.” “In your mind,” Demetrius began, “As horrible as it is, son, you accepted the illness as natural,” Demetrius said to me. “Seth’s scars were not.” “What were your thoughts during the wedding?” Dara asked. “Especially before that kiss,” Demetrius asked with a grin. “I’ll never forget it,” I said and looked at Seth, “You and I had just been announced as married. I always thought you were so handsome, so kind, and very intelligent…I knew you’d be a great king. I also knew others had trouble seeing past the scars. I wished they could and the scars would go away.” Dara was nodding, “And emotionally?” It was my turn to blush, “I’ve never loved anyone as I did Seth then. It wasn’t just lust,” I admitted quietly, “I loved Seth and it’s grown since then.” Demetrius chuckled softly, “There’s nothing wrong with lust. It helps with the solidifying of a marriage.” “And there’s your answer!” Lukus said logically and happily. “Lust is perfectly natural.” Dara’s smile faded, “Even if you did cure King Alexander, there is no way of knowing he would still be alive.” “If we could,” Demetrius said seriously, “We would cure everyone. People die. Even us. It’s a part of life. If we could have, we would have cured Toby’s and Dennis’ mother. And cured Toby’s deafness.” I looked at Toby, “Why? There’s nothing wrong with Toby. He is a genius! He and Dennis taught Toby to speak!! His eyesight is phenomenal…” Demetrius nodded squeezing me, “We agree.” He assured me. “There is not anything wrong, but IF he was raised by other parents who would think he was a simpleton.” He waved at Toby, “He has thrived and grown with you two.” “Sickness and death is not your fault,” Dara added. “You can’t blame yourself.” I knew what they were saying, but I still felt regret. “Perhaps not,” I admitted, “but I still don’t like it. It’ll take time to accept it.” Seth pulled me away from Dara and Demetrius and hugged me tightly. “I will never blame you. You didn’t cause my father to die. I know you loved him.” “And I still do,” I said. “He was a good and great man.” Seth nodded, “Yes, he was.” He pulled back a little to look at my face. “And you saved my life. Not from the scars, but from the Thornes. You gave me a new life away from them.” I kissed him, “I still feel guilty. I could have done something.” I held my hand up to stop him from saying anything, “Give me a chance to get it in my head.” I looked at Demetrius and Dara, “Do you feel emotions that intensively every time you use the magic?” Every Child of Lilith nodded. I gave a grudging nod of appreciation. “Wow.” I turned to Thomas, “We need to stay here a while to help with these people setting up the government. You and Toby can’t go home on your own. Write a letter,” I said to Thomas, “to your mother and father. I’ll write one to them, too.” I looked at Demetrius, “Can I impose on you again to deliver the letters again?” “We need one to send to Sam, too.” Seth stated. “He knows about you, but please refrain from just popping in, please.” Seth chuckled, “He will recognize you.” He waved at Demetrius grinning, “You don’t change!” Demetrius nodded, “I will. I’ll even deliver to King Yannick.” “This threat,” Martha said, “has been taken care of. Another will be here in a month.” I turned quickly to Martha, “More Druids?” Martha shook her head, “Puritans.” Lukus nodded, “They heard of someone that had unknown powers he used. They are Witch Hunters.” “Puritans?” I repeated. “Those no pleasure, not even with sex, people in Europa?” “They have some settlements in the northeast,” Seth nodded. “I have seen the locations on the map, but from what I’ve been told, they are a sad group of people.” “I’ve met a few,” I nodded. “Four came before my father and there was a larger group, about seven men and six women came before Christian.” “And?” Demetrius asked with a smile. “What did you think about them?” I shrugged, “They weren’t pleased with A’Dore’s,” I did finger quotes with my fingers as I used the word they used, “Opulence for show.” I really did snort at that, “What’s wrong with enjoying things like beauty? Our rooms, especially the Throne Room, were too bright!? It was constructed to allow a lot of sunshine in. Too bright!? Of course, it is. All the Scribes and Arbitrators had to see to work! What’s wrong with a sunny room? All the artwork around, including the statues, there were some were not clothed and a few paintings were nudes. They were,” I did finger air quotes again, “indecent.” “They said that!?” Seth balked. “To your father or Christian!?” “Oh, no,” I shook my head, “to each other. We had and have a very loyal staff. We trust them. They told us what was overheard. Everyone is entitled to an opinion, but I even saw them frown at the flowers Ella insisted on having them arranged throughout the palace! We have a garden and greenhouse to do just that!” I looked at Demetrius and Dara. “Flowers! What’s wrong with them? Or the Human body? That’s beautiful, too! A miracle! But not them. They wore drab colors, usually black…and black can be pretty, but not on them!” “There’s nothing wrong with beauty,” Martha said. “The world is very beautiful. It’s our home.” “I remember the visit with Christian the most.” I turned to those at the table. “They stayed three days.” I glanced at Seth, “This was before there was an us,” I turned to our Creid friends, “I admit it,” I said, raising my left hand and putting it over my heart. My right hand went up as if I were being sworn and taking an oath. “My first encounter with any Creid were some escort bayan that had enjoyed those hot cavern baths under the palace. Did you know it has Sulphur in the water? They did stink.” The Creid chuckled. They knew. I went on, “I thought the Creid didn’t bathe, but these Puritans asked for two tubs of hot water one day. They all shared.” I turned to Seth, “The bath water, not the bath like some people do.” I winked at Seth. It was no secret that Seth and I shared a daily bath whenever we could. Seth chuckled and turned to Max, “Here he goes again.” Max smiled and said, “I know he makes a good marriage very interesting.” “I can’t recall any dull moments,” Seth smiled. I turned to my main audience, Toby. He had two zany fathers. Seth made him laugh and so could I. “That we bathed every day, sometimes twice was vanity,” I threw my hands up in helplessness. “Vanity? How about common decency? More than once a week they say, a bath is the sin of vanity!? Why would anyone want you to share their daily ick? Why would anyone want yours?” I used one of Dennis’ words and pounded one hand in the other to emphasize the next words, “You work hard all day. How can they sleep like that? The best sleep is a clean body on clean sheets! They bathed on Saturday night so they were clean for church. They sat there in church for hours!” I turned again to Demetrius and Dara, “They were as bad, if not worse, than the Church in Roma!” Demetrius was smiling as I turned, “Let it out. How do you really feel about the Puritans?” “They are poisonous!” I said, “Smelly, poisonous people that take the joy out of being alive.” “How many are coming?” Val asked. “You’re telling us, they must be a threat.” Martha nodded, “Over a hundred. They carry swords and spears.” “They know how to use them?” I asked. Lukus nodded, “Quite a few of them do.” He chuckled and pointed at me, “I don’t know if they can fight with a sword like you can…” “Like I could,” I corrected. “I’m not twenty anymore.” Demetrius laughed out loud, “I can barely remember twenty! That was…” he tried to think and then shook his head, “quite a few centuries ago. I saw you sparing with Darrin recently. You still have the ability. You have time to train and get it back.” Chitto stood up, “But there are no swords. The Natives don’t use swords.” He turned to Toby, “You don’t have that many fire-lances. Can more be made?” “That long metal rod that was so loud?” Reese asked to be sure. “If we have the metal,” Val said. “We’re Creid, we know forging and work with metals.” He said confidently. “Sure,” Toby nodded, “I can show you how. I had Zeke make the ones I have. My concern will be this dampness. The black fire powder has to be dry to work.” “Let’s get the rods first,” I said, “we’ll worry about the powder then.” “Excuse me,” Seth said, waving his hand for everyone’s attention, “Thank you. These are Natives here. You can’t tell me no one here uses a bow and arrow.” He pointed out. “If someone could tell us the path they’re using…” he looked at Demetrius and then Lukus. “We can set up places to watch them and if necessary, shoot them and remain hidden.” I did sort of cringe at that. And Seth picked up on that immediately, “Oh, come on, Babe! We’re the good guys and they are the bad guys. You can’t see that as wrong.” My eyes rolled and I frowned at Seth, “Can we use reasoning first? Try to deescalate the situation. Do we attack for no reason?” “You have reason, but have you ever tried to reason with one of them?” Lukus asked. “No,” I nodded. “It’s probably not possible. They should be given warnings. It’s a rule.” “Dad’s right,” Toby said, “It’s in the Rules of Engagement. I’ve read it.” “Of course, you have, son,” Seth muttered. “In the A’Dore’s Library?” Toby grinned, “Yes. The Book Lender is good in Royal Valley,” he shrugged, “but I’ve read all the interesting ones.” Seth nodded, still muttering, “Sure, that’s logical.” Dakotah and two other Natives came in. “How are things with you?” Dakotah asked us and saw what was on the table. His surprise only lasted a split second to realize what happened. “Would you and your warriors like some?” Ceto asked standing. “I’ll be back shortly.” She told Beau, who smiled at her and nodded. Then she addressed Dakotah and the other Natives, “There’s plenty more.” Dakotah looked around, but saw no pot or anything. Reese chuckled, “If Beau has drained Ceto’s magic filling him up.” “Do I have to remind you of the loaves and fishes that feed thousands?” Ceto wasn’t bothered. “With plenty left over!” Dakotah bowed slightly, “It would be an honor.” Ceto pointed to a low table and pillows that weren’t there when they came in. The other braves jumped back a little, but Dakotah said something in a language none of us knew except Chitto maybe. It was a calm tone and I know it was to tell them to calm down. Three steaming bowls of Ceto’s stew were there. “When others come,” Ceto said, “There will be more.” She returned to her place by Beau. “If things heat up more with those two,” Seth whispered to me, “And it gets serious. He’ll catch up with her in a few years and pass her in age appearance!” “Yes,” I nodded. “She knows about him and it doesn’t bother her. She’ll have to tell him if it does, that she and Beau can’t have children.” Seth cleared his throat and pointed a thumb at Toby, “Neither could we.” My eyebrows rose, “Now, why didn’t I think of that?” “Your brain was sort of busy,” Seth said, kissing me on the temple. “I love you.” I smiled and kissed more. As much as you can with others there watching, “I know. I love you.” “I know.” I looked back at Beau, “We shouldn’t rush them down any aisle. Beau’s been hurt before. Let him enjoy this. I don’t believe Ceto will hurt him.” Dakotah had sent couriers to all the representatives of each tribe telling them what happened and asking them to come in two days and we would get things together to decide what to do. We had Dakotah sit with us and filled him in with our plan. Thomas was mentally gathering what to say in his letter and he frowned, “Excuse me,” he said to us. His hand was out a little as if he could stop us physically, “I know what part of the continent we are, but what is this city’s name?” Dakotah nodded, “We always referred to ourselves as the Tribe of Wahkooha. We should resurrect the original tribe’s name that lived here. It would be a good name for this city.” Seth did his upward nod telling Dakotah to continue. He wasn’t so Seth asked. “And what is it?” “See-ahlsih,” Dakotah replied. Seth attempted to repeat it, “See at…what?” (Come on, I practically spell it out for you. The only major American City named for a tribe!) He shook his head as he did when no Native was named Bob or Tom. I wasn’t sure why Dakotah never one time asked any question of us. That caused a question in me, and you know me. I asked. “Do you know what we are, Dakotah?” Dakotah sat back looking at us carefully before answering, “You claim to be just people, but what we saw was clearly the power of the spirits. Like Wahkooha, but you say we are the same.” I picked up the knife and ran my left hand over the sharpness of the blade and then held my hand up to show it was bleeding. “What I know of your gods and spirits, they don’t bleed. I do.” Dakotah’s eyes widened, but Seth was suddenly in motion asking, “What are you doing!?” I grabbed Demetrius’ hand and quickly did the same thing. Too fast for Demetrius to stop me. “Ow!!” He held his bleeding hand up. “Are you CRAZY!?” I smiled and hugged him quickly, “Not a bit.” I looked at his face and even though he was hundreds of years old, right now he looked like Seth’s and my boys when they were small and suffered a cut or bruise. “You know I love you.” I chuckled pulling his head toward mine and rested our foreheads together, “I did the same thing to me. I’m sorry for the pain, but I’m just proving your humanity.” I pulled the hand he was cradling closer and pulled his hand down, “Now show Dakotah your hand!” “You could have asked me!” Demetrius said loudly. “A little warning?” But opened his bleeding hand. Again, Dakotah’s eyes widened. “I’m sorry, Dad, but it was necessary!” I said, trying not to laugh. “This way was quick and hurt less than taking your blood to see the difference under the seers.” I showed my bleeding hand that Seth was grabbing and wrapping with a cloth napkin. “You know I love you and I know you love me.” “Still,” Demetrius said as Dara began calmly wrapping his hand. “Ow.” He said again softer to me. You couldn’t miss the little smile on Dara’s face. “Is Dad Fae?” Toby asked about me, trying not to allow his own smile to be seen. He failed. Demetrius leaned forward toward Toby, “Strictly by the translation of the word, no.” He held his uninjured hand up, “No more so than any other Human. That includes you. The Gaelic and Celts came up with the name. We are all the Children of Adam.” “Yes,” Toby nodded, “but they called you Fairies because you could use the magic. You did something supernatural like a fairy. Dad did, too.” Demetrius gave a grudging nod, “Well, yes…” He pointed behind himself at his back, “Do you see any wings? No fairy wings here and no angel wings either” Then he jerked his hand away when Dara tied the napkin off. “Ouch!” Dara wasn’t too concerned as she looked at Toby, “We allowed that word to be used because people always assume we’re witches or demons, dear.” “Your Daddy,” Demetrius looked at Seth, “He had to be convinced we weren’t demons.” He ground out. Seth nodded, “It took a while to realize he wasn’t.” “Being a Son of Adam is supernatural enough,” Lukus said, “Who are you?” He asked Toby. “Toby,” Toby’s brow wrinkled. “You know me.” “Where are you?” Lukus asked. “I can’t say the name he said yet,” Toby pointed at Dakotah. “I’m in a Native city up north eating dinner.” “What are you going to be when you grow up?” Lukus asked. Toby shrugged, “I don’t know.” “You are aware you have choices,” Lukus smiled. “Do animals have choices? A lion is a lion, a hunter. A cat is a cat, who does cat things like chasing mice. Only people have choices. We are aware of ourselves and where we are. That’s supernatural.” He waved his hands out. “We’re all natural.” “Every Child of Adam can use the magic,” Demetrius smiled. “That’s why I insisted you were all included against Wahkooha.” “Adam could use the magic?” Seth asked. “Do you know how old he was when he died?” Demetrius smiled. Seth and Toby looked at me like I would know. I sighed because I knew what the scriptures said. “He was 930 years old, Eve’s age I never saw.” Lukus patted his own chest, “Just like us!” “And that was all adult years for Adam!” Demetrius added. “They were created immortal in the garden as young adults. The only clue is that Eve didn’t have any children while in the garden. Adam and Lilith did. They didn’t start aging until they were cast from the garden into the world after disobeying God.” “There is nothing about any children of Adam and Eve before that.” Dara said. “The magic wasn’t coming as readily when Adam was cast out.” Lukus said. Seth shook his head, “But Erik did! Can Christian use it?” “Christian is…” Dara thought how to say it, “not as open minded as Erik is.” “When a decision needed to be made,” Demetrius said nodding, “Erik heard about the story of Cinderella and asked Ella if her Godmother would help him with the decision, so Dara sent me! His mind was open to the idea of it being a possibility.” “Erik saw a lot of magic by Demetrius,” Dara said. “But he always suspected the magic was there.” “So,” Demetrius added, “It just naturally happened! His use of the magic was going to happen.” As always, I was protective of Christian, “Be fair. Christian is a very good man and is a fantastic king. He’s learned to be very pragmatic. He seeks the sensible and the logic of situations. When he met Demetrius and saw magic, he accepted it.” “Only because he saw it and couldn’t ignore the empirical evidence,” Demetrius corrected. “He had a tough time seeing me as a friend and not a demon or witch.” Seth was going to say something, but Demetrius pointed a finger at him, “Don’t say it!” He said mockingly stern. “How do you know what I was going to say?” Seth grinned, “You can’t read minds.” “No,” Demetrius nodded, “but after nearly ten years, I can read your face. I don’t know what you were going to say but it was smartass, whatever it was. You know it’s true.” Toby gave up trying to hide his immense pleasure and began laughing hard. And it wasn’t just for Toby. Demetrius was always like this. “You are all like us?” Dakotah stated finally. “Yes,” I nodded. “That was my point. We were raised in different cultures and from different parts of the world. But we are the same as you.” Dakotah nodded, thinking, “If we know the route they are using. We can set up men in some strategic places. They are coming from the northeast?” “Yes,” Martha nodded. “My wife sees things like this better than any of us,” Lukus said proudly, taking her hand and bringing it up and kissing the back of her hand. “I don’t recall her ever being wrong.” Martha smiled at her husband, “That’s what I do. I watch prodigies for art and music. I have to know who and where they are to get them where they can inspire these young ones to reach their potential.” She smiled at Seth and me. “You’ll be surprised when you get to A’Dore again.” Seth’s eyes widened, “Why? What’s happening in A’Dore?” “I won’t tell you,” Martha said, “I said it to make you anxious to get home, but you’ll see.” “Not even a hint about who or what!?” Seth asked. “No,” Martha smiled. I looked at Demetrius and then Lukus, “She’s mean.” “You can find out can’t you?” Seth whispered to Demetrius. “Can’t you see things?” Demetrius looked at Martha and then back at Seth and whispered back. “I can see nothing about that.” Lukus chuckled, “I assume you asked if he would check on the situation.” He looked at Ceto, “I’ll ask you not to. And don’t anyone try to see. Martha’s very bursa escort good at seeing, but she’s also very good at keeping anyone else from seeing. She taught me!” He shook a finger at us, “Don’t spoil the surprise!” I looked at Seth who shrugged. We’d have to wait. “Back to the Puritans,” Max said. “What are Puritans?” Toby asked. I saw Max roll his eyes at another delay. I chuckled, “We’ll get to it, Max.” I looked at Toby, “Have you read about the Reformation?” “Refor…” Toby tried to say the word and quit, “What you said. What is that?” I smiled, “It happened in Europa and Britannia. It’s not surprising you didn’t read about it. There were people over there that didn’t like or agree with the Church. Especially the ones in Britannia. They had a new Church set up, The Church of England. The Puritans didn’t believe the Church of England reformed enough, so they started their own group. They were persecuted, so they came to this continent. They are in the northeast from Blethos and Royal Valley on the Atlantic coast.” “There are how many!?” Max asked Martha in a rushed tone. “What’s the problem, Max?” Chitto asked. “A hundred!” Max said, “I know we have a month, but if one of us heads back to Creid now, he could come back with more warriors!! They might get back in time.” Chitto looked at Max, “Have you asked if these people here have men that can protect See-ahlsih? It is their home.” “We have many Braves that will defend See-ahlsih.” Dakotah smiled with a nod. “Can they fight?” Max asked. “My guys and I are very good, but a hundred!? We might need backup.” I shook my head and chuckled, “You’ve never seen Natives fight, have you?” “Not really,” Max said. “All the Natives I’ve met…” he shook his head. “What about tactics? Bows and arrows will be good for a high assault, but…” “You didn’t keep up with your Native heritage,” I said. “Natives have tactics you wouldn’t believe!” I looked at Chitto, “My cousin told me about it.” “Sure did!” Chitto said, “Tell them, Dakotah.” Dakotah chuckled, “Our Braves are very skilled with the bow and arrow. They can hit a target even if they are moving on a fast horse. They’re great shots. They can hide from approaching armies until that army is on top of them. They had sneak up behind someone and not be heard even walking over dry leaves. And they know the terrain, these Puritans do not.” “How can you think otherwise?” Chitto asked. “Well,” Max was looking at Dakotah, “I thought you were these nature hugging, animal lovers.” Dakotah laughed, “We are. We live as one with Mother Earth and she gives us her bounty and we have a duty to take care of what she gives to us. But we have endured many conflicts from many cultures. Our Braves can fight.” Max heard it, but was having a difficult time believing it. Finally, he said, “I need to see it.” “And so, you shall!” Dakotah assured. “We can arrange for you to see it tomorrow.” “Okay, Chief Dakotah,” I said and smiled at the man. “How is it you speak English as well as we do?” Dakotah chuckled, “I have friends from Europa and Britannia that would visit often when I lived as a Kalispel.” He gave a wink at me, “And a few weren’t just Trappers, but learned men who wanted to map this area.” Those learned men would have to be to make a legible map. We, A’Dore, Blethos and Creid needed to get copies of those maps. As we ended our evening, telling Dakotah we would all discuss what we were going to do. Our Children of Lilith were offered a place to stay, but declined. When Dakotah looked puzzled, they simply vanished. Dakotah and the other warriors were startled, but the Children of Lilith had arrived by simply appearing, so simply vanishing left a “where did they go” look on their faces. They also saw the table and chairs were gone and the low table with the pillows had returned and all the used plates, bowls, goblets, and cloth napkins were also gone and the table was clean and the wood table shined. Clean up was done! Yep, Grace would be so jealous. We were escorted to some rooms on the second floor. It was much like the first floor, but if you looked closely, you noticed the corridor curved to make the circle curving sooner. Of course, it was. As much as I loathed geometry, I understood why. This “palace” was like a ball or a bubble. Even the most simple minded would know if you build up inside the ball, the distance, or area would be shorter. We were all given rooms all of which held a single man or two comfortably. In the case of our party, we were doubled up. They were all fine with it. Seth and I naturally were together. Toby and Thomas were paired in a room next to us and so on with the others. It wasn’t spacious as our bedrooms were in A’Dore, Blethos, or our room in Royal Valley. It was more like the palace in Creid. They were smaller to be easier to heat and keep the warmth in. There was a bed big enough for the two of us. Two small doors on one side behind one was a smaller version of the toilets we’d seen. The other had ropes that hung with a handle. I pulled it and rain fell in the little room. It was warm water. There were no windows. I wondered how they kept these rooms cool. I was surprised and it showed on my face. “What?” Seth asked. I gave a wobbling nod, “Nothing is wrong, but…” I waved at our room. Low ceiling and small space with the bed and small stove. Not a metal stove we normally had, but stone. It didn’t have to heat that much and the fire was going and the room was warm as heat radiated off the stones. Like an oven. Only in reverse. “It’s a nice room.” “Okay,” Seth nodded. “So?” “Natives don’t have rooms,” I sort of moaned. “We stayed with Chitto and Nila.” I held my hand up to make a point, “They did have a ROOM separate for Nila, Chitto, their infant son Mayka, and Tadi. That was just common courtesy for if the baby or Tadi woke with a problem. They have progressed to have permanent homes. Rooms are still not what Natives do.” I waved at the bed, “And that should not be here. It’s a bed. We slept on those big pillows on the floor. Remember?” I shook my head and looked at the surrounding room. “When we ate dinner here, we sat at a table. Dara made that change.” “And that’s bad?” Seth asked. “No,” I answered. “Cultures evolve with the world. We are not the first pale faces that have come to the tribes.” “Pale faces?” Seth chuckled. I grinned at Seth, “That’s the name we were given when we arrived.” I shrugged, “I mean the Cherokee, Muskogee, and almost every tribe identified us that way.” I waved over my own body, “In spite of having some Native blood, I’m still paler than Chitto or his father Harjo, but you…” I chuckled. “You work so much in the vineyard, only part of you is pale.” Seth nodded, “And only you see any pale part of me.” He said with a grin. “You’re in the sun all day!” I said, “And you won’t wear a hat…” “They fall off!” Seth said, “And they get in the way.” “My POINT is,” I continued as Seth walked over and put his arms around me. “These are Human Beings. Each tribe has a unique take on Native Culture. It shouldn’t go away. We need to be careful.” “They affected ours,” Seth said. “When we arrived all those centuries ago we learned to be tolerant and accepting. When we first got here we almost starved. If the Natives hadn’t stepped in and helped us…” I was impressed, “You attended some history lessons.” I smiled. Seth laughed a little, “It was more interesting than the tutors discomfort with my scars. We learned that people could be amazing. All people.” “Were Darius and Deena sick during those lessons?” I asked sourly. “They were there,” Seth confirmed. “They must not have paid attention.” “They must have thought he meant all people in their class,” I chuckled. “Servants weren’t in their class and didn’t matter. Natives probably didn’t count as people.” “I’m sure you’re right.” Seth nodded. “Change is going to happen in a culture,” I said. “I just don’t want them to lose who they are.” “You are the most important person in my life,” Seth said. “You’re the most important person in my life,” I said. “Shall we remind each other we know that and who we are?” Seth said, pushing me back on the bed. “I love you,” I said, pulling him closer, but he and I were already pressed together. “I know,” Seth said, kissing me. “I love you.” “I know.” We slept well. The bed was very comfortable. The clothes we put on after our baths were only worn at dinner. There was a lighter weight outfit we put on…after we made love. The room was warm, but it would get cooler when the fire died out. Warm blankets, comfortable bed, and warm company we almost overslept. Dressing in the clothes from the previous night, Seth and I checked on Toby and Thomas, but their bed was empty. So was their little toilet and rain shower-room. I read that Egyptians had that hundreds of years before Christ was even born. Whatever they poured the warm water in, it let the water out in steady streams. I didn’t want anyone to stand over me and pour anything on me. Seth and I used a lot of water for our baths. Only one of us would fit the shower-room at one time. We did Beau’s game of stone, parchment, and knife. Seth was going first. The best two out of three. “Where’s the damned soap?” Seth asked from in the room. Looking around, I smiled at the little rectangle…thing and a gourd container. On the one piece of furniture other than the bed. There were other items, too almost hidden. Picking up the gourd, it took the stopper out and wiggled the liquid in it. The little ridged rectangle-shaped cake I picked up. I sniffed it and could smell it. The soap were yucca roots and bee honeycomb. I was certain there were other things, but didn’t worry about it. The gourd was yarrow-flowers and something else. After Seth used it a while, “I’m not going to be worrying about bears, am I? You know they like honey.” I chuckled, “I don’t think that’s possible. All the bears are hibernating.” “Yeah?” Seth said. “It would be my luck to stumble on a grouchy, hungry bear with insomnia.” He couldn’t see my big smile at his quip. I loved that man. Then I took mine as we did those other morning things like shaving and brushing teeth. The Natives here had what could be a very successful inn. The room held the heat well during the night. I had to know who designed and built it. I also wanted to know how they cooled it off during the short summer. They had ten months of cool and wet, with freezing and wet in the middle. The warm and sunny were the two remaining months. That was told to us by Chitto who would know. Coming into the dining area, I was pleased to be sitting on the pillows again. I saw Toby and Thomas, as Toby signed while he was eating. “No fair!” Thomas stopped Toby’s hands, “I’m not as good with signing and can’t sign that fast. I certainly can’t talk with my mouth full!” Toby shrugged, not bothered. He swallowed looking at Seth and me. “Good morning, you have got to try Miss Ceto’s…” he paused and said a word he’d just learned that morning, “sof-kee,” he looked at Thomas, “Did I say it right?” Thomas nodded and looked at us, “You did, Tobe.” A nickname for his cousin and one syllable. “Ceto said it was sofkee or sofgee. It’s very good.” He pointed at his hot bowl of porridge-like dish. “There is also hoecakes topped with butter and maple syrup!” “And beans!” Toby added holding up his bowl of beans. “They are better than Grace’s.” “Okay, son,” Seth said pointing at him with his stern finger. “Before we go home, we should talk about what we don’t talk about with Grace! That’s one thing right there.” “But they are!” Toby insisted, “Grace makes good beans, but hers are soft and kind of soupy. These are kind of crunchy, hot, and a little sweet.” “Natives find a way to serve them with almost every meal,” I explained, “but Grace might be a little hurt that you like something more than hers. She helped feed you all your life practically.” “Oh,” he said as he understood. We saw Ceto eating at the table. Again, Beau was next to her. All of Lilith’s Children we knew were there. “Maple syrup?” Seth asked Ceto as we sat. “Isn’t that made from sugar maples?” Ceto nodded, “Sugar maples, red maples, and black maples.” “And this syrup?” Seth asked. “Sugar maples.” Ceto stated. “And it’s hot!” “Are there sugar maples around here?” I smiled and asked. “I wouldn’t think they would live in this environment. It’s too cold and wet.” Ceto put her fork down with a louder clank than normal. She sighed, “I got it from the northeast. I added the sugar needed and some other things. The cows I got the butter from aren’t here either. Do I need to tell where they are, too?” She wasn’t mad or angry, but a little put out. “I used the magic to make this. I don’t actually cook anything. Not over a fire anyway. What good does the magic do if I can’t do this?” I chuckled, “I wasn’t complaining!! You do this very well and know how it should come out and make sure it does.” Seth nodded, “That’s talent.” Ceto was smiling a little, “At least you know that it takes more than just a snap of your fingers. You have to know what and how to have it come out right. There is effort. Thank you.” I looked at Max, “Good morning, Max!” Max swallowed as he waved then used his napkin before saying, “Good morning! I slept like the dead! Didn’t even move.” Val leaned over and stage-whispered, “He slept alone,” he chuckled, “You know why.” “I do NOT snore!!” Max said loud. “I think a few female moose thought it was a mating call,” Chitto added. “They’re probably waiting on you.” Max growled softly. “I need someone to spar with and train more,” I said, but still smiled at the teasing they gave Max. “Jason was good, but there’s always room for improvement.” I looked at the Creid, “And give me your best, nobody is to take it easy on me!” Max nodded, “Absolutely not. Our adversary won’t take it easy on you. It would be criminal of us to do that for any reason to you. You’ll probably be able to fend off Beau.” He grinned “Maybe.” He looked at me closer, “You need to think about training with that new armor Yannick showed you and told you about. You’ll need to get used to it.” I nodded, but I didn’t like training for a regular suit of armor. Movement was too restrictive. This armor was supposed to be lighter. I’d give it a try.

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